"If you know what you are going to write when you’re writing a poem, it’s going to be average. Creating a poem is a continual process of re-creating your ignorance, in the sense of not knowing what’s coming next. A lot of poets historically have described a kind of trance. It’s not like a Vedic trance where your eyes cross, and you float. It’s a process not of knowing, but of unknowing, of learning again. The next word or phrase that’s written has to feel as if it’s being written for the first time, that you are discovering the meaning of the word as you put it down."

Derek Walcott, as cited in Advice to Writers by Jon Winokur (via litverve)

(via faineemae)

"I wanted you,
in every way someone shouldn’t want someone else.
In every way that God begs you not to.
The kind of wanting that your parents lock you away for.
The kind of wanting that leaves your mother bawling and crying on the floor of the foyer of your house,
at 3:30 in the morning,
slapping her chest and pounding the ground,
beseeching God, asking him why he gave her a daughter like you
after you come home covered in finger prints,
that look strikingly like the devils."

Key Ballah, Wanting Bad Things (via key writes)

(via faineemae)

"You forced me to love you,
every time you said my name you forced me deeper and deeper into the bottomless pit.
When you left, you swore that you never asked for this,
that you never asked for a permanent place in me like the 4 letters of your name tattooed on my skin.
You said,
“You are too heavy, this is too much”
and you walked away, you walked away and forgot
that every time you touched me, your fingers begged me to fall in love."

Key Ballah (www.keywrites.com)

(via faineemae)

lolitaintheskywithdiamonds:

lamp from the interior’s section of Victoria Maiden

(via lavendork)

greuze:

Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836–1912)The Roses of Heliogabalus (Detail)Oil on canvas, 1888

greuze:

Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836–1912)
The Roses of Heliogabalus (Detail)
Oil on canvas, 1888

(via quietlobo)

stories-yet-to-be-written:

The Best Pictures Of This Year’s Japanese Cherry Blossoms

The Japanese cherry blossom, known as the Sakura in Japanese, is the flower of a cherry tree that is cultivated for its decorative features rather than for cherries (it doesn’t bear fruit). The overwhelming beauty of the cherry blossom bloom has been known and adored for ages. The blooming period is associated with Japanese traditions, culture, aesthetics, and is a bittersweet metaphor for the ephemeral nature of life itself.

The blooming cherry blossoms herald the beginning of the centuries-old Hanami festival – the traditional Japanese custom of picnicking under trees rich with flowering Sakura branches and enjoying this short but striking first breath of spring. The blossoming wave usually starts in Okinawa in January or February and progresses through all of Japan until April or May. The cherry blossom front (Sakura zensen) can be conveniently tracked every year using this calendar.

Source: Demilked Magazine

(via wait-just-a-diddly-darn-minute)

magictransistor:

Ouroboros

magictransistor:

Ouroboros

(via a-rare-poach-cozy)

red-lipstick:

Maiko Takeda (Tokyo born, London based) - Atmospheric Reentry collection, 2013

red-lipstick:

Maiko Takeda (Tokyo born, London based) - Atmospheric Reentry collection, 2013

(Source: maikotakeda.com)

fairytalemood:

Fairytail series by ASZA

(via madcarnival)

inkfromtheoctopus:

Vigilius Eriksen,The Queen Dowager Juliane Marie (detail) 1776.

inkfromtheoctopus:

Vigilius Eriksen,The Queen Dowager Juliane Marie (detail) 1776.

(via egberts)